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Planet Social is Grateful for Cassini’s Discoveries

On Friday, NASA space probe Cassini plunged into Saturn after a 20-year mission to the ringed planet. The post Planet Social is Grateful for Cassini’s Discoveries appeared first on The Good Men Project.

What we're hoping to learn from the magnetic readings of Cassini's final orbits

It was a proud but sad moment when NASA announced that mission control had lost the signal from the Cassini spacecraft on September 15. As it takes the signal over an hour to travel from Saturn to Earth, this meant that the spacecraft had already been destroyed in Saturn's atmosphere.

BECAUSE ANTHROPOGENIC GLOBAL WARMING IS DOGMA, NOT SCIENCE:  Why can’t the lessons of NASA’s Ca…

BECAUSE ANTHROPOGENIC GLOBAL WARMING IS DOGMA, NOT SCIENCE:  Why can’t the lessons of NASA’s Cassini be applied by Warmists?

The Last Photo Cassini Took Was Its Forever Home On Saturn

For those who've followed NASA's Cassini mission these past 20 years, it's still a bit hard to believe it's gone. On Friday, September 15, the spacecraft plunged itself into Saturn's atmosphere, becoming part of the planet it had studied tirelessly for 13 years. Show More Summary

Ep. 457: Why Did Cassini Have To Die? In Memoriam

It's time to say goodbye to an old friend, NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which has been orbiting within the Saturnian system since 2004. But why does a seemingly healthy spacecraft and mission need to come to an end? Today we look back at the mission, some of the amazing discoveries, and why its finale was necessary.

See Cassini's last look at Saturn's weird yin-yang moon - CNET

NASA shares the spacecraft's final view of dark and light surfaces contrasting on Saturn's fascinating moon Iapetus.

NASA’s Cassini captured an unexplained Saturn ‘glitch’ before its fateful dive

NASA's Cassini spacecraft completed its incredibly successful extended mission last week, punctuated by a fiery death at the hands of Saturn's upper atmosphere. But just before the orbiter bid farewell it captured an image of an area...Show More Summary

Cassini Took One Last Look At A Mysterious Glitch In Saturn's Rings Before It Died

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute Peggy is something along the edge of Saturn's ring, a glitch whose source we've never seen. Cassini took a last peek at Peggy during its Grand Finale destructive plunge, adding a final piece to the puzzle for future researchers to pour over when trying to understand this mysterious disturbance. More »      

Saturn ruled this scientist's life for 40 years — here's why she's begging NASA to go back after Cassini's death

Linda Spilker began researching Saturn at NASA's Jet Propulsion laboratory four decades ago. She worked on the Voyager mission and was on the Cassini mission to Saturn, which recently ended, from start to finish. Because there's a chance...Show More Summary

NASA RADIO --Three Cassini Scientists Tell Us What They Learned from the Epic Mission (LISTEN Today's 'Galaxy' Stream)

Listen to a podcast conversation with three members of the original Cassini science team in a special episode in honor of the Cassini mission, which came to its dramatic close on September 15: Jeff Cuzzi, the mission’s interdisciplinary scientist for...        

Cassini Spacecraft Crashes Into Saturn

NASA received its last data transmission from the Cassini spacecraft at 4:55:46 a.m. PDT Friday, before losing contact with the probe as it hurtled into Saturn's atmosphere. It was a fiery grand finale for the probe, which spent 13 years orbiting the ringed planet. Show More Summary

The Cassini Team Reflects On How It Feels To Say Goodbye To Their Spacecraft

Last week, NASA's Cassini spacecraft slammed into the day side of Saturn, the brief flash of its vaporisation marking the end of a 13-year mission. But it took people to turn this hunk of aluminium and silicon into an extension of our curiosity. More »      

NASA's Cassini Mission Ends After 13 Years

last weekNews : The Cutline

NASA scientists called Cassini "a perfect spacecraft" that delivered until the very end, sending back spectacular images and a better understanding of Saturn, one of the universe's planets.

Recommended Reading: Why Cassini had to be destroyed

Analysis: Why Nasa's Cassini Probe Had to Be Destroyed Fedor Kossakovski, PBS By now, you've likely read a bit about NASA's Cassini probe plunging into Saturn to end its tour of duty this week. You've also probably wondering why that had to happen. PBS breaks it down.

Cassini space probe ends its 20-year journey

It's been 20 years since the Cassini spacecraft blasted off to begin its historic exploration of Saturn. Since then, the NASA probe has traveled nearly five billion miles to study Saturn and its rings, discovering six moons and taking more than 453,000 pictures of the planet. On Friday, its mission ended. Jamie Yuccas reports.

Tracing Cassini's fiery death was like seeing a heart monitor flatline

At a Nasa site nestled in a valley not far from Australia’s capital city, a lucky few get a closer view of the end of the spacecraft’s 20-year odyssey Deep Space Station 43 is an imposing piece of hardware. It’s a 70-metre diameter radio...Show More Summary

Watching Cassini’s last moments from inside NASA mission control

The Cassini team was at once somber and excited as they watched the spacecraft’s radio heartbeat flicker out. Mika McKinnon joined them to say goodbye

Cassini scientists celebrate the mission's end with a few hundred of their closest friends

Hundreds of scientists and their families gathered at Caltech in the wee hours of Friday morning to bid farewell to Cassini, the NASA spacecraft that spent the past 13 years exploring Saturn.

Cassini scientists celebrate the mission's end with a few hundred of their closest friends

Hundreds of scientists and their families gathered at Caltech in the wee hours of Friday morning to bid farewell to Cassini, the NASA spacecraft that spent the past 13 years exploring Saturn.

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