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Why Has Our Sun Been Freaking Out So Much Lately?

The solar flare as seen by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory on September 10, 2017. (Image. NASA/SDO/Goddard) Since early last week, the Sun has belched out a steady stream of solar flares, including the most powerful burst recorded in the star's current 11-year cycle. Show More Summary

NASA: Solar "Irma" Observed --Sun Erupts with an X8.2 Flare (WATCH Video)

The sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 12:06 p.m. EDT on Sept. 10, 2017 captured on video below. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts...        

Sun erupts with significant flare

The sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 12:06 p.m. EDT on Sept. 10, 2017. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Show More Summary

Sun erupts with significant flare

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The sun emitted a significant, X8.2-class solar flare, peaking at 12:06 p.m. EDT on Sept. 10, 2017. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the eve...

See two intense X-class solar flares light up the sun - CNET

2 weeks agoTechnology : CNET: News

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory gets an eyeful of two powerful solar flares.

Two significant solar flares imaged by NASA's SDO

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The sun emitted NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured images of two significant solar flares on the morning of Sept. 6, 2017.

Two significant solar flares imaged by NASA's SDO

The sun emitted two significant solar flares on the morning of Sept. 6, 2017. The first peaked at 5:10 a.m. EDT and the second, larger flare, peaked at 8:02 a.m. EDT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured images of both events. Show More Summary

NASA's SDO captures image of mid-level flare

The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 4:33 pm EDT on Sept. 4, 2017. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful...Show More Summary

NASA's SDO captures image of mid-level flare

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 4:33 pm EDT on Sept. 4, 2017. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event.

Incredible NASA Video Shows What the Total Solar Eclipse Looked Like From Space

The compilation includes views from the International Space Station, the Solar Dynamics Observatory and other spacecraft.

Image: NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory watches a sunspot

On July 5, 2017, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory watched an active region—an area of intense and complex magnetic fields—rotate into view on the Sun. The satellite continued to track the region as it grew and eventually rotated across the Sun and out of view on July 17.  

Two weeks in the life of a sunspot

On July 5, 2017, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory watched an active region—an area of intense and complex magnetic fields—rotate into view on the Sun. The satellite continued to track the region as it grew and eventually rotated across the Sun and out of view on July 17.

Data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory offer clues about sun's coronal irradiance

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with Aberystwyth University in the U.K. has used data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to learn more about how the sun's corona behaves over differing stages of its 11-year cycle. In their paper...Show More Summary

NASA’s Solar Observatory Films Rapidly-Growing Black Spot as It Rotates to Face Earth --"Dark Core is Larger Than Our Planet" (VIEW)

An active region on the sun — an area of intense and complex magnetic fields — has rotated into view on the sun and seems to be growing rather quickly in this video captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory between...       Related Stories "Extraterrestrial Climate Change" --World's Scientists Ask: What is the Lifespan of Technological Civilizations  

NASA's SDO watches a sunspot turn toward Earth

An active region on the sun—an area of intense and complex magnetic fields—has rotated into view on the sun and seems to be growing rather quickly in this video captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory between July 5-11, 2017.

NASA's SDO watches a sunspot turn toward Earth

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) A new sunspot group has rotated into view and seems to be growing rather quickly in this video captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory between July 5-11, 2017.

This year-long time-lapse of the sun reveals its incredible power

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) used powerful HD cameras to film the sun for an entire year then sped up the footage to create this mesmerizing time-lapse. Zach Wasser contributed to an earlier version of this video. Follow Tech Insider: On Facebook Join the conversation about this story »

SDO sees partial eclipse in space

On May 25, 2017, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, saw a partial solar eclipse in space when it caught the moon passing in front of the sun. The lunar transit lasted almost an hour, between 2:24 and 3:17 p.m. EDT, with the moon covering about 89 percent of the sun at the peak of its journey across the sun's face. Show More Summary

NASA's SDO sees partial eclipse in space

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) On May 25, 2017, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory saw a partial solar eclipse in space when it caught the moon passing in front of the sun. The lunar transit lasted almost an hour, with the moon covering about 89 percent of the sun at the peak of its journey across the sun's face.

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