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Hubble sees galaxy cluster warping space and time

This picturesque view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope peers into the distant universe to reveal a galaxy cluster called Abell 2537.

Hubble and Gaia team up to measure 3-D stellar motion with record-breaking precision

(ESA/Hubble Information Centre) A team of astronomers used data from both the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and ESA's Gaia satellite to directly measure the 3-D motions of individual stars in a nearby galaxy. The achieved accuracy is better than anything previously measured for a galaxy beyond the Milky Way. Show More Summary

Image: Hubble's cosmic search for a missing arm

This new picture of the week, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the dwarf galaxy NGC 4625, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). The image, acquired with...Show More Summary

Image: Reflection nebula NGC 1999

This spooky sight, imaged by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, resembles fog lit by a streetlamp swirling around a curiously shaped hole – and there is some truth in that. While the 'fog' is dust and gas lit up by the star, the 'hole' really is an empty patch of sky.

Hubble digs into cosmic archaeology

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is chock-full of galaxies. Each glowing speck is a different galaxy, except the bright flash in the middle of the image which is actually a star lying within our own galaxy that just happened to be in the way. Show More Summary

Hubble discovers 'wobbling galaxies'

(ESA/Hubble Information Centre) Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered that the brightest galaxies within galaxy clusters 'wobble' relative to the cluster's centre of mass. This unexpected result is inconsistent with predictions made by the current standard model of dark matter. Show More Summary

Image: Hubble captures collision of two galaxies

This image, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows what happens when two galaxies become one. The twisted cosmic knot seen here is NGC 2623—or Arp 243—and is located about 250 million light-years away in the constellation of Cancer (The Crab).

Hubble observes source of gravitational waves for the first time

(ESA/Hubble Information Centre) The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has observed for the first time the source of a gravitational wave, created by the merger of two neutron stars. This merger created a kilonova -- an object predicted by theory decades ago -- that ejects heavy elements such as gold and platinum into space. Show More Summary

Image: Hubble's compact galaxy with big-time star formation

As far as galaxies are concerned, size can be deceptive. Some of the largest galaxies in the Universe are dormant, while some dwarf galaxies, such as ESO 553-46 imaged here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, can produce stars at a hair-raising rate. Show More Summary

Bursting with starbirth

(ESA/Hubble Information Centre) This oddly shaped galactic spectacle is bursting with brand new stars. The pink fireworks in this image taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope are regions of intense star formation, triggered by a cosmic-scale collision. The huge galaxy in this image, NGC 4490, has a smaller galaxy in its gravitational grip and is feeling the strain.

First hints of water detected on Earth-sized TRAPPIST-1 planets

Water could be present on some of the Earth-sized planets orbiting the dwarf star TRAPPIST-1, according to work from an international group of astronomers. They utilized the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to estimate substantial amounts of water could be present in the outer planets, including three in the habitable zone. This boosts the possibility those planets are livable.[...]

Hubble delivers first hints of possible water content of TRAPPIST-1 planets

(ESA/Hubble Information Centre) An international team of astronomers used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to estimate whether there might be water on the seven earth-sized planets orbiting the nearby dwarf star TRAPPIST-1. The results suggest that the outer planets of the system might still harbour substantial amounts of water. Show More Summary

Image: Section of Hubble solar wing

A deceptively valuable wall hanging: this section of the NASAESA Hubble Space Telescope's solar array flew for eight years in space before being returned to Earth aboard a Space Shuttle, and is now displayed at ESA's technical centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

Hubble displays a dwarf spiral galaxy

The subject of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a dwarf galaxy named NGC 5949. Thanks to its proximity to Earth—it sits at a distance of around 44 million light-years from us, placing it within the Milky Way's cosmic neighborhood—NGC 5949 is a perfect target for astronomers to study dwarf galaxies.

Half Of Our Galaxy Might Have Come From Other Galaxies

Image Credit. NASA, ESA, Hubble Space Telescope; Processing. Douglas Gardner Any Carl Sagan fan knows you're made of star stuff. Protons don't decay into any other particles (as far as we can tell), so you can reliably assume that most bits of you have been around since a second after the Big Bang. Show More Summary

Galactic David and Goliath

The gravitational dance between two galaxies in our local neighbourhood has led to intriguing visual features in both as witnessed in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. The tiny NGC 1510 and its colossal neighbour NGC 1512 are at the beginning of a lengthy merger, a crucial process in galaxy evolution. Show More Summary

Galactic David and Goliath

(ESA/Hubble Information Centre) The gravitational dance between two galaxies in our local neighbourhood has led to intriguing visual features in both as witnessed in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image. The tiny NGC 1510 and its colossal neighbour NGC 1512 are at the beginning of a lengthy merger, a crucial process in galaxy evolution. Show More Summary

Image: Hubble's galaxy NGC 4242

Tucked away in the small northern constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs) is the galaxy NGC 4242, shown here as seen by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy lies some 30 million light-years from us. At this distance...Show More Summary

Hubble spots a barred lynx spiral

Discovered by British astronomer William Herschel over 200 years ago, NGC 2500 lies about 30 million light-years away in the northern constellation of Lynx. As this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows, NGC 2500 is a particular kind of spiral galaxy known as a barred spiral, its wispy arms swirling out from a bright, elongated core.

Hubble spots a barred lynx spiral

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Discovered by British astronomer William Herschel over 200 years ago, NGC 2500 lies about 30 million light-years away in the northern constellation of Lynx. As this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows, NGC 2500 is a particular kind of spiral galaxy known as a barred spiral, its wispy arms swirling out from a bright, elongated core. 

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