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Black hole makes material wobble around it

The European Space Agency's orbiting X-ray observatory, XMM-Newton, has proved the existence of a "gravitational vortex" around a black hole. The discovery, aided by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, solves...Show More Summary

NuSTAR observes X-ray binaries in the nearby Andromeda galaxy

7 months agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observatory has discovered 40 previously unknown X-ray binaries in the nearby Andromeda galaxy (M31). Astronomers believe that these phenomena may have played a key part in heating...Show More Summary

Andromeda galaxy scanned with high-energy X-ray vision

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, has captured the best high-energy X-ray view yet of a portion of our nearest large, neighboring galaxy, Andromeda. The space mission has observed 40 "X-ray binaries" -- intense sources of X-rays composed of a black hole or neutron star that feeds off a stellar companion.

New study sheds light on source of mysterious black hole flares

9 months agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

Observations carried out by NASA's Swift and Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) space telescopes may have located the source of intense X-ray bursts emitted by supermassive black holes. According to NASA, the phenomenon can...Show More Summary

Black hole has major flare

The baffling and strange behaviors of black holes have become somewhat less mysterious recently, with new observations from NASA's Explorer missions Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. The two space telescopes...Show More Summary

Buried Supermassive Black Holes --"Millions Exist in the Universe" (Weekend Feature)

Astronomers found evidence for a large population of hidden supermassive black holes in the Universe. Using NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite observatory, the team of international scientists detected the high-energy x-rays from five supermassive black holes previously clouded...

Discovery of ‘Monster Black Holes’ Points to the Existence of Millions More

British astronomers, using Nasa's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite observatory orbiting the Earth, have discovered five new ‘supermassive' black holes, leading scientists to suggest that they've vastly underestimated the number of these phenomena in our galaxy.

Five 'Buried' Supermassive Black Holes Detected --"Huge Number Exist Throughout Universe"

Astronomers have found evidence for a large population of hidden supermassive black holes in the Universe. Using NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) satellite observatory, the team of international scientists detected the high-energy x-rays from five supermassive black holes previously...

NuSTAR captures mysterious high-energy X-ray glow from the center of the Milky Way

NASA astronomers have used the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) to spot a glow of high-energy X-rays emanating from the heart of the Milky Way galaxy. The origin of the mysterious glow is unknown, with scientists speculating that it may be caused by dead stars as they draw material from their stellar partners... Show More Summary

New solar spacecraft takes first photo—and it is absolutely stunning

2 years agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmodo

NuSTAR—NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, the most sensitive high energy X-ray telescope ever invented—has taken its first picture of the Sun ever and it looks absolutely amazing. Like the prettiest Christmas tree ornament. Read more...

NuSTAR's amazing first image of the sun

2 years agoHumor : Boing Boing

Via NASA/JPL, this amazing image is one of the first shot by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. A larger version is available here. Read the rest

NASA’s NuSTAR telescope discovers brightest recorded pulsar

2 years agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

Astronomers have used NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) to detect the brightest-ever recorded pulsar. The distant object was happened upon by the team while observing a recent supernova in the region. In the longShow More Summary

That's not a Blackhole...Its a Pulsar! The Impossible Pulsar With All the Power of 10 Million Suns

Astronomers working with NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), led by Caltech's Fiona Harrison, have found a pulsating dead star beaming with the energy of about 10 million suns. The object, previously thought to beShow More Summary

NuSTAR discovers impossibly bright dead star

Astronomers working with NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), led by Caltech's Fiona Harrison, have found a pulsating dead star beaming with the energy of about 10 million suns. The object, previously thought to be a black hole because it is so powerful, is in fact a pulsar—the incredibly dense rotating remains of a star. read more

Impossibly bright dead star: X-ray source in the Cigar Galaxy is the first ultraluminous pulsar ever detected

Astronomers working with NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) have found a pulsating dead star beaming with the energy of about 10 million suns. The object, previously thought to be a black hole because it is so powerful, is in fact a pulsar -- the incredibly dense rotating remains of a star.

Pulse of a dead star powers intense gamma rays

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, is helping to untangle the mystery of what powers high-energy gamma rays emanating from supernova. The observatory's high-energy X-ray eyes were able to peer into a particular site of powerful gamma rays and confirm the source: A spinning, dead star called a pulsar.

Black Holes: Kings Of The Universe

Black holes have been the celebrity of astronomy since Einstein and friends first thought of their existence in the early 1900s. A century later, NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has reported that it captured an “extreme and rare event” in the neighborhood of a super-massive black hole. Michael Parker, who headed the group of

Rare X-Ray Corona Observed Collapsing into an Extreme Supermassive Black Hole

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has captured an extreme and rare event in the regions immediately surrounding a supermassive black hole. A compact source of X-rays that sits near the black hole, called the corona, has moved closer to...

NuSTAR gives tantalizing hints about how stars go supernova

2 years agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is unraveling the mystery of how stars go supernova by mapping the remnants of radioactive material left in the wake of a supernova. The findings go against previous theories to create...Show More Summary

NASA's NuSTAR untangles mystery of how stars explode

One of the biggest mysteries in astronomy, how stars blow up in supernova explosions, finally is being unraveled with the help of NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). read more

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