Discover a new way to find and share stories you'll love… Learn about Reading Desk

Trend Results : Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array NuSTAR


Blog Post Results (1-20 of 56)

FILTER RESULTS

NASA’s NuSTAR telescope discovers brightest recorded pulsar

2 months agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

Astronomers have used NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) to detect the brightest-ever recorded pulsar. The distant object was happened upon by the team while observing a recent supernova in the region. In the longShow More Summary

That's not a Blackhole...Its a Pulsar! The Impossible Pulsar With All the Power of 10 Million Suns

Astronomers working with NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), led by Caltech's Fiona Harrison, have found a pulsating dead star beaming with the energy of about 10 million suns. The object, previously thought to beShow More Summary

NuSTAR discovers impossibly bright dead star

Astronomers working with NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), led by Caltech's Fiona Harrison, have found a pulsating dead star beaming with the energy of about 10 million suns. The object, previously thought to be a black hole because it is so powerful, is in fact a pulsar—the incredibly dense rotating remains of a star. read more

Impossibly bright dead star: X-ray source in the Cigar Galaxy is the first ultraluminous pulsar ever detected

Astronomers working with NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) have found a pulsating dead star beaming with the energy of about 10 million suns. The object, previously thought to be a black hole because it is so powerful, is in fact a pulsar -- the incredibly dense rotating remains of a star.

Pulse of a dead star powers intense gamma rays

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, is helping to untangle the mystery of what powers high-energy gamma rays emanating from supernova. The observatory's high-energy X-ray eyes were able to peer into a particular site of powerful gamma rays and confirm the source: A spinning, dead star called a pulsar.

Black Holes: Kings Of The Universe

Black holes have been the celebrity of astronomy since Einstein and friends first thought of their existence in the early 1900s. A century later, NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has reported that it captured an “extreme and rare event” in the neighborhood of a super-massive black hole. Michael Parker, who headed the group of

Rare X-Ray Corona Observed Collapsing into an Extreme Supermassive Black Hole

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has captured an extreme and rare event in the regions immediately surrounding a supermassive black hole. A compact source of X-rays that sits near the black hole, called the corona, has moved closer to...

NuSTAR gives tantalizing hints about how stars go supernova

10 months agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is unraveling the mystery of how stars go supernova by mapping the remnants of radioactive material left in the wake of a supernova. The findings go against previous theories to create...Show More Summary

NASA's NuSTAR untangles mystery of how stars explode

One of the biggest mysteries in astronomy, how stars blow up in supernova explosions, finally is being unraveled with the help of NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). read more

NuSTAR helps untangle how stars explode

For the first time, an international team of astrophysicists, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists, have unraveled how stars blow up in supernova explosions. Using NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR)...Show More Summary

WIRED Space Photo of the Day: Radioactive Remnant

The mystery of how Cassiopeia A exploded is unraveling thanks to new data from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR. In this image, NuSTAR data, which show high-energy X-rays from radioactive material, are colored blue. Lower-energy X-rays from non-radioactive...

Dead star and distant black holes dazzle in X-rays

Two new views from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, showcase the telescope's talent for spying objects near and far. One image shows the energized remains of a dead star, a structure nicknamed the "Hand of God" after its resemblance to a hand. Another image shows distant black holes buried in blankets of dust.

NASA captures the Flaming Fist of God 17,000 light-years away from us

11 months agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmodo

Humans like to see things where there's nothing but visual patterns. Even NASA: the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has captured an "image [that] shows the energized remains of a dead star, a structure nicknamed the Hand of God after its resemblance to a hand." Except now it looks more like The Flaming Fist of God. Read more...

Dead star and distant black holes dazzle in x-rays

Two new views from NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, showcase the telescope's talent for spying objects near and far. read more

Image of the Day: Cluster of Supermassive Black Holes Discovered

NASA's black-hole-hunter spacecraft, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, has captured images its first 10 supermassive black holes. The mission, which has a mast the length of a school bus, is the first telescope capable of focusing the highest-energy...

WIRED Space Photo of the Day: Bagging Black Holes

NASA's black-hole-hunter spacecraft, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, has "bagged" its first 10 supermassive black holes. The mission, which has a mast the length of a school bus, is the first telescope capable of focusing the highest-energy X-ray...

Catching black holes on the fly

Teaser NASA's black-hole-hunter spacecraft, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, has "bagged" its first 10 supermassive black holes. The mission, which has a mast the length of a school bus, is the first telescope capable of focusing the highest-energy X-ray light into detailed pictures. read more

NuSTAR delivers the X-ray goods

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, is giving the wider astronomical community a first look at its unique X-ray images of the cosmos. The first batch of data from the black-hole hunting telescope was made publicly available Aug. 29, via NASA's High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center, or HEASARC.

Image of the Day: Sculptor Galaxy's Black Hole "On/Off" Cycle

Nearly a decade ago, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory caught signs of what appeared to be a black hole snacking on gas at the middle of the nearby Sculptor galaxy. Now, NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which sees higher-energy X-ray...

NASA Puts New Spin On Black Holes

Scientists in the US have successfully used a new NASA telescope to help improve our understanding of how black holes and galaxies evolve. Using data taken by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, and the European Space...Show More Summary

Copyright © 2011 Regator, LLC