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Growing better trees faster

(University of Oxford) Using a breeding technique called 'genomic selection', researchers from the Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh and from Forest Research, an agency of the Forestry Commission, hope to accurately identify, at a very early age, fast growing trees with superior timber quality. Show More Summary

Eat more chicken: Scientists hone in on genetics behind chicken weight adaptation

(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Taking advantage of a special experimentally-bred population, the Virginia chicken lines, Uppsala University scientist Orjan Carlborg has now led an international research to achieve a better understanding of the genetic architecture behind chicken weight.

New rules urgently needed to protect our oceans, scientists warn

Urgent action is needed to protect marine life, with more than 60 per cent of the world's oceans lacking effective conservation measures, according to new Oxford University study.

Bac-for good: Bacteria passed between generations benefits you more than others

Bacteria passed straight to children have more healthcare benefits than if they are transmitted via the surrounding environment, new Oxford University research reveals.

Bac-for good: Bacteria passed between generations benefits you more than others

(University of Oxford) Bacteria passed straight to children have more healthcare benefits than if they are transmitted via the surrounding environment, new Oxford University research reveals.

New light on the secret life of badgers

(University of Oxford) Badgers are more sociable than often thought, with implications for how they transmit disease, new Oxford University research reveals. Using security tracking technology more commonly used to protect museum artwork, the Oxford research has revealed fresh insights into the animals' social behavior.

Iconicity.

Helen DeWitt at paperpools posts a quote from Pharaoh’s Land and Beyond, ed. Pearce Paul Creasman and Richard H. Wilkinson (Oxford University Press, 2017) posted in turn by Rolf Degen (@DegenRolf) on Twitter (where he “performed various arcane manipulations to come up with a quotation that blithely bypasses the 140-character limit”). I can’t copy and […]

The Last Surviving Species on Earth: Hints at Life Beyond Our Solar System --"They Will Exist Until the Sun Dies"

The world's most indestructible species, the tardigrade, an eight-legged micro-animal, also known as the water bear, will survive until the Sun dies, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. "Tardigrades are as close to indestructible as it gets on Earth,...        

My latest encounter with a stranger

Rawan Yaghi meets an Israeli student at Oxford University and is amazed how little she knows about Gaza: "This girl may not deserve my direct sentiments of disgust and anger. But since her comfortable life and her plans in life are made...Show More Summary

Anglotopia Goes to Oxford: Pre-Trip Post – Full Itinerary Revealed – Details of Whole Trip With Last Minute Changes

Tomorrow I leave for Oxford and I go to achieve a lifelong dream. For one week, I’m going to get to live like a student at the University of Oxford. I’m going to attend real lectures by Oxford professors and get an experience I’ve always...Show More Summary

Complex gas motion in the center of the Milky Way

How does the gas in the centre of the Milky Way behave? Researchers from Heidelberg University, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Oxford, recently investigated the motion of gas clouds in a comprehensive computer simulation. Show More Summary

The last survivors on Earth

(University of Oxford) The world's most indestructible species, the tardigrade, an eight-legged micro-animal, also known as the water bear, will survive until the sun dies, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.

Key Results From the 2017 Digital News Report

Oxford University’s Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism have just released their 6th annual Digital News Report, which has quickly become one of the most widely read and most valuable source of top-level data on digital news consumption trends around the world. Having gone through all 136 pages, here's what I think are the most interesting findings:

AI is nothing to be afraid of (yet)

Professor Nick Bostrom doesn’t need a crystal ball to predict the future; he’s got an institute for that. He’s the founding director of the Future of Humanity Institute (FHI) at Oxford University. The institute works with researchers...Show More Summary

The wiser brain: Insights from healthy elders

(University of Oxford) The archetype of old wise elders distinguished for their wisdom and sound judgement continues to inspire dreams of reaching a bright and enlightened old age.

African Hubs as Assemblers of Technology Entrepreneurs

Indigo Trust highlights a new paper:Dr Nicolas Friederici, a postdoctoral researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute, part of the University of Oxford, undertakes research into why digital entrepreneurship flourishes in some places but not in others. Show More Summary

Swiss Fossil Discovery Solves Triassic Reptile Mystery

The Marine Reptile That Wasn't -  Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi A team of scientists from Zurich University and the University of Oxford have resolved a scaly, fourteen-year mystery concerning a small reptile that lived some 241 million years ago in the Middle Triassic.  The little diapsid named Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi has had quite a chequered history, but thanks to a

Hursthouse's Virtue Ethics - Part 2

I am continuing with my commentary on Rosalind Hursthouse, “Normative Virtue Ethics,” from Roger Crisp, ed., How Should One Live? (Oxford University Press, 1996), 19-33. The last two sections of this article have to deal with conflicts...Show More Summary

When butterfly male sex-bias flaps its wings

(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) In butterflies, sex is determined by chromosome differences. But unlike in humans with the familiar X and Y, in butterflies, it is the females that determine the sex of offspring. Show More Summary

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