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Two Political Lessons from Germany's Energiewende

Political actors in countries with coordinated market economies, such as Germany, prefer a process giving rise to decisions unanimous among main stakeholders. But for the Energiewende – Germany’s plan to transition to nearly 100 percent renewable energy by 2050 – unanimity is constrained. read more

Assorted links

1. What are the most Democrat and Republican names? 2. Survey paper on behavioral political economy. 3. Do seals rape penguins? 4. Virginia Postrel on the spontaneous order that is Wikipedia. 5. The great chicken soup stagnation. 6. “India is going to use coal because that’s what it has…” 7. Should we “dream smaller” in […]

How to Fix the Economy: Going Beyond GDP and Politics as Usual

Co-authored with Natalie Cox, Coordinator of the Center's Caring Economy Campaign Pundits tell us that Republicans just took over Congress because of popular discontent with our economy. Exit polls showed that 45% of voters said "the...Show More Summary

Positive ‘Spin’ Grows U.S. Economy … But For How Long?

American political and economic elites are forever spinning the idea that self-sustaining economic growth is imminent. And this time the spin might be working — but only for a while.

How did police bust ‘dark web’ druglords? Human error and idiocy

Spectator Money is out, with ideas on how to make it, spend it and even how to be seen spending it. Freddy Gray looks at the ‘social economy’ - think tax loopholes for financiers of politically… Continue reading The post How did police bust ‘dark web’ druglords? Human error and idiocy appeared first on Spectator Blogs.

Why political gridlock works for the U.S. economy, but not for Japan or EU

2 weeks agoNews : The Great Debate

Both Republicans and Democrats are now eager not to do any damage to an economic recovery that is slowly becoming more sustainable. So U.S. macroeconomic policy will almost certainly remain unaffected by the election.

Statshot: Money, Super PACs and Running in the Cold

This week in Statshot: money may not buy happiness, but countries with growing economies, as well as more stable politics, tend to have more satisfied citizens; runners in colder American cities are somewhat more likely to move their runs indoors over the winter, but they are even more likely to skip that jog entirely; and more.

Reframing Our Perception of National Security

National security is undeniably the issue at the forefront of the collective minds of the American public, more so than the economy, immigration reform, or any other major political issue. It's difficult to determine whether this isShow More Summary

Is it still 'the economy, stupid?'

Dan Henninger at the Wall Street Journal thinks Obama's weaksauce economy cooked Democrat geese during the midterm elections: "Low economic growth in the modern U.S. economy is a total, across-the-board, top-to-bottom political loser." Normally “economic growth” is an economist’s term of measurement. Show More Summary

Nomi Prins: Why the Financial and Political System Failed and Stability Matters

Yves here. We're delighted to be featuring a post by Nomi Prins, a former Goldman managing director turned critic of the way the financial services industry has become a "heads I win, tails you lose" wager with the entire economy at stake. Show More Summary

The Values Election We Didn't Have -- And Must Have

Tuesday's elections have left us with a dismal political landscape in Washington, D.C. and exposed the deep dissatisfaction many Americans feel with the economy and the functioning of government. The results also, let's be frank, pay...Show More Summary

The Republicans’ 2014 landslide: Worse than 2010

WASHINGTON — For Democrats, the 2014 election was not the 2010 Republican landslide. It was worse. Four years ago, the economy was still ailing and a new wave of conservative activism in the form of the tea party was roiling politics. This time, the economy was better, ideological energies on the right had abated — [...]Show More Summary

2014 Election Lesson: Politics Is About Delivering For Your Constituents

Politics is about delivering for your constituents. Underneath it all, this election was a statement by people against an economy that is not working for them. We've heard the story but here it is again. Most people say the country is...Show More Summary

2014 Election Lesson: Politics Is About Delivering for Your Constituents

Politics is about delivering for your constituents. Underneath it all, this election was a statement by people against an economy that is not working for them. We've heard the story but here it is again. Most people say the country is...Show More Summary

2014 Election Lesson: Politics Is About Delivering For Your Constituents

Politics is about delivering for your constituents. Underneath it all, this election was a statement by people against an economy that is not working for them. We've heard the story but here it is again. Most people say the country is...Show More Summary

Why Does America Have a Bad Case of Political Whiplash?

There's a simple reason voters keep veering between Democrats and Republicans: It's the economy, stupid.

Ag Economy; Policy Issues; Regs; Biofuels; Climate; and Political Notes- Wednesday

Agricultural Economy Grant Gerlock reported yesterday at The Salt blog (National Public Radio) that, “U.S. farmers are bringing in what’s expected to be a record-breaking harvest for both corn and soybeans. But for many farmers, that may be too much of a good thing. “Farmers will haul in 4 billion bushels of soybeans and 14.5 billion […]

In Michigan, Frustration Over Economy at the Polls

Voters on both sides of the political aisle here expressed frustration with incumbents and the pace of the state’s - as well as the nation's - economic recovery.

Agricultural Economy; Regulations; and, Political Notes- Tuesday

Agricultural Economy Bloomberg writers Megan Durisin and Whitney McFerron reported yesterday that, “Corn and soybeans fell in Chicago on speculation that dry weather will accelerate harvests that are forecast to be the biggest ever in the U.S., the world’s top producer of the crops. “Farmers collected about 83 percent of soybeans in the main growing areas […]

Why do competitors get to challenge claims that consumers don’t?

2 weeks agoIndustries / Law : 43(B)log

I have a political economy explanation for this, but I don’t think that’s good enough. Challenging a “tests prove” claim—explicit or implicit—in Lanham Act cases means showing that the tests don’t prove the proposition for which they are cited. Show More Summary

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