Trend Results : Prehistoric Women Had


Blog Post Results (1-13 of 13)

FILTER RESULTS

Prehistoric women's arms 'stronger than those of today's elite rowers'

Katherine Grainger and Anna Watkins celebrate Olympic victory in 2012. Neolithic women’s arm bones were about 30% stronger than those of women today. Photograph: Francisco Leong/IOPP Pool/Getty Images Prehistoric women had stronger arms...Show More Summary

"Hidden history" of labor suggests prehistoric women would outmuscle today's elite rowers

2 months agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

New research looking at the bone strength of European women living through the first 6,000 years of farming suggests they had quite the work ethic. So much so, their arms may have been stronger than today's elite rowers, with scientists...Show More Summary

Prehistoric women were stronger than modern rowers

2 months agoArts : Artdaily

Prehistoric women had stronger arms than modern-day rowers, likely due to the rigors of early farming which included tilling fields and grinding grain by hand, researchers said Wednesday. The study in the journal Science Advances isShow More Summary

Prehistoric Women Had Muscular Arms to Die For

Pummeling grains for up to five hours a day gave prehistoric women the kind of muscular arms a girl only dreams of today. That's according to researchers at Cambridge University, who used CT scans to compare the upper arm and shinbones of 83 modern women with those of 94 women...

Links 11/30/17

Time between world-changing volcanic super-eruptions less than previously thought PhysOrg (Chuck L) Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today’s elite rowing crews PhysOrg (Chuck L). This is not as surprising as the authors make out. Rowing is an endurance sport. For strength, the maximum exertion period for strength-related activities is ~2 minutes. That is based […]

Prehistoric Women Had Stronger Arms Than Competitive Rowers Today

2 months agoHealth : Time: Healthland

Today’s athletes may be strong, but they’ve got nothing on prehistoric women who spent their days harvesting crops and grinding grain. According to a new study in the journal Science Advances, the average woman who lived during the first 6,000 years of farming had stronger upper arms than modern-day female rowing champions. The study “highlights…

Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today's elite rowing crews

A new study comparing the bones of Central European women that lived during the first 6,000 years of farming with those of modern athletes has shown that the average prehistoric agricultural woman had stronger upper arms than living female rowing champions.

Prehistoric women had stronger arms than today's elite rowing crews

(University of Cambridge) The first study to compare ancient and living female bones shows the routine manual labor of women during early agricultural eras was more grueling than the physical demands of rowing in Cambridge University's famously competitive boat clubs. Researchers say the findings suggest a 'hidden history' of women's work stretching across millennia.

Prehistoric women had extremely strong arms from a life of manual labor

2 months agoHealth : The Checkup

Prehistoric women laborers put more strain on their arms then modern crew teams, a new study suggests, and "we've largely been underestimating the scale of this work."

Prehistoric women's arms 'stronger than those of today's elite rowers'

New light shed on role of women in ancient communities, as bone analysis reveals profound effect of manual agricultural labour on the human body Prehistoric women had stronger arms than elite female rowing teams do today thanks to the...Show More Summary

Premiered This Day: Women of The Prehistoric Planet

Written and directed by Arthur C. Pierce, and starring the perennial C-list actor John Agar (who had his own Prehistoric Theme Park!), this is just about as bad as it gets.

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC