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Genetic test for anal cancer could identify those at high risk

(Queen Mary University of London) A new test, based on a patient's epigenetics, could be an accurate and inexpensive way to find and treat those at highest risk of anal cancer -- a disease with growing incidence in women, men who have sex with men (MSM) and people with HIV.

What will happen to European criminal law after Brexit?

Britain will not be able to select which sections of the European Union criminal law system it abides by, as was previously the case. This is according to Valsamis Mitsilegas of Queen Mary University of London in the UK, author of an article in Springer's journal Criminal Law Forum that assesses the future of European criminal law after Brexit. Show More Summary

Nicotine enhances bees' activity

Nicotine-laced nectar can speed up a bumblebee's ability to learn flower colours, according to scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Clinics should choose women's breast screening appointment times to improve attendance

(Queen Mary University of London) For women who miss a breast screening appointment, giving a fixed date and time for a new appointment could improve poor attendance and be a cost-effective way to shift national participation trends, according to an analysis led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Loss of Spinal Cord Neurons May Not Be a Good Predictor of MS Disability, British Study Finds

Loss of spinal cord neurons may not be a reliable tool to predict disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), contrary to what was originally thought, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London. Their study, “Axonal loss in the multiple sclerosis spinal cord revisited,” appeared in the journal Brain Pathology. Show More Summary

Loss of spinal nerve fibers not the only cause of disability in multiple sclerosis

(Queen Mary University of London) Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have now sampled spinal cords of thirteen people with MS and five healthy controls, and found that spinal cord cross sectional area is not a good predictor of axonal loss.

The extent of neuronal loss in the brain during MS

(Queen Mary University of London) A study by researchers from Queen Mary University of London establishes for the first time the extent of neuronal loss in the brain of a person with MS over their life, and finds that demyelination may not be as good an indicator of disease progression as previously thought.

Pupils' mental health improved through school-based program, study shows

(Queen Mary University of London) School-aged children can be taught to better their mental health through intervention programmes delivered at school, suggests a new study carried out in east London and led by an academic at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Fukomys livingstoni, I presume?

(Queen Mary University of London) Two new species of African mole-rat have been discovered by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), together with colleagues in Tanzania and at the University of Pretoria.

Tories cut labor lead in London to three points

(Queen Mary University of London) New poll from Queen Mary University of London and YouGov.

Asthmatic schoolchildren are 'uncomfortable' using their inhalers

(Queen Mary University of London) Poor asthma control and knowledge are common in children with doctor-diagnosed asthma, according to research by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizes

Changes in the body size of animals measured under controlled laboratory conditions have been shown to closely match changes in body size with seasonal warming in nature, according to research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizes

(Queen Mary University of London) Changes in the body size of animals measured under controlled laboratory conditions have been shown to closely match changes in body size with seasonal warming in nature, according to research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

People who watch entertainment TV are more likely to vote for populist politicians

(Queen Mary University of London) People exposed to entertainment television are more likely to vote for populist politicians according to a new study co-authored by an economist at Queen Mary University of London. The researchers investigated...Show More Summary

Tracing down linear ubiquitination: New technology enables detailed analysis of target proteins

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Quantum physics offers insight into music expressivity

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) are bringing us closer to understanding the musical experience through a novel approach to analysing a common musical effect known as vibrato.

New protein discovered in aging and cancer

(Queen Mary University of London) A protein has been found to have a previously unknown role in the ageing of cells, according to an early study by Queen Mary University of London. The researchers hope that the findings could one day lead to new treatments for aging and early cancer.

Negative coverage of the EU in UK newspapers nearly doubled over the last 40 years

(Queen Mary University of London) A study co-authored by researchers at Queen Mary University of London has revealed that negative coverage of the European Union in UK newspapers increased from 24 percent to 45 percent between 1974 and 2013.

Researchers working with bees proved for the first time that insects can be trained to perform complex tasks

Researchers at London's Queen Mary University demonstrated that bees can be trained to perform complex tasks. In their experiment, a real bee was shown the task of moving a mini football into a circle by a fake bee. The real bee was then able to copy its actions and perform the same task. Show More Summary

Highly effective cervical cancer screening for low-income countries

(Queen Mary University of London) Taking a small sample of cells from women at high-risk of cervical cancer could be a cost-effective and accurate strategy for early diagnosis in low and middle income countries, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London.

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