Trend Results : Research In Motion


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Watch this new robot move so fast it becomes a blur

yesterdayHumor / odd : Boing Boing

This new origami-inspired robot, "milliDelta," created by Harvard researchers, moves so quickly all you can see is a blur. In fact, moving at 70 motions a second, it's the "smallest, fastest, and most precise of its kind," according to The Verge. The robot can be used in assembly lines as well as as assisting in delicate surgery.

2017 ASCB Celldance Videos Showcase Pathogens and Actin in Motion

PLOS Pathogens discusses Celldance’s winning video and scientific communication with Meningococcus research and author Dr.Guillaume Duménil  Every year, The American Society for Cell Biology (ACSB) provides an avenue for researchers worldwide to enrich their science

How robot math and smartphones led researchers to a drug discovery breakthrough

For us humans, a healthy brain handles all the minute details of bodily motion without demanding conscious attention. Not so for brainless robots – in fact, calculating robotic movement is its own scientific subfield.

Study uncovers key to preventing back pain in runners

(MediaSource) Low back pain is a common complaint among both elite and recreational runners, but the true cause of it remains a mystery. So researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center used motion capture technology to observe how a runner's muscles work while they're in motion.

Fish use deafness gene to sense water motion

Fish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. Show More Summary

Fish use deafness gene to sense water motion

(Case Western Reserve University) Fish sense water motion the same way humans sense sound, according to new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Researchers discovered a gene also found in humans helps zebrafish convert water motion into electrical impulses that are sent to the brain for perception. Show More Summary

Lymph node surgery may raise risk of arm morbidity in younger women

(American Association for Cancer Research) Younger breast cancer patients who underwent axillary lymph node dissection were more likely to experience arm swelling and decreased range of arm motion than patients who received sentinel lymph node biopsies, according to data presented at the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 5-9.

Researchers generate electricity from low-cost biomaterial

(University of Limerick) Mobile phone speakers and motion detectors in cars and video games may soon be powered by electricity generated from low cost and sustainable biomaterials, according to research carried out at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland.

Scientists capture colliding organic nanoparticles on video for first time

(Northwestern University) A Northwestern University research team is the first to capture on video organic nanoparticles colliding and fusing together. This unprecedented view of 'chemistry in motion' will aid Northwestern nanoscientists...Show More Summary

Robot takes an elevator

2 months agoHumor / odd : Boing Boing

From YouTube description: "This video shows ongoing research towards using the feet of a legged robot for simple manipulation tasks. In this example, ANYmal makes use of its large range of motion to reach up to press an elevator button. The button is localized with help of a QR tag." [via Bruce Sterling]

Waves in lakes make waves in the Earth

(University of Utah) In a study published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth, scientists at the University of Utah report that small seismic signals in lakes can aid science. As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws. Show More Summary

In a first for wearable optics, researchers develop stretchy fiber to capture body motion

(The Optical Society) Research in Optica offers the first demonstration of optical fibers sturdy enough to sense a wide range of human motion.

In a first for wearable optics, researchers develop stretchy fiber to capture body motion

The exciting applications of wearable sensors have sparked a tremendous amount of research and business investment in recent years. Sensors attached to the body or integrated into clothing could allow athletes and physical therapists...Show More Summary

Genome architecture caught in motion

(The Wistar Institute) Researchers at The Wistar Institute have uncovered new aspects of the three-dimensional organization of the genome, specifically how the genetic material is compacted and de-compacted in a timely fashion during the different phases of the cell cycle.

With new UK design studio, Leap Motion explores the boundaries of augmented reality

Mixed-reality sensor and peripherals maker Leap Motion Inc. signaled its intention to expand its efforts in the virtual and augmented reality industry with the announcement today of a London-based design research studio. A spokesperson...Show More Summary

Did Blackberry Get Too Old For Innovation?

Blackberry Limited, a Canadian company – previously known as Research In Motion Limited (RIM) – was founded in 1984. The company is renowned for its range of smartphones, tablets and other services. Blackberry is said to be the original smartphone makers. Show More Summary

Caution ahead: The growing challenge for drivers' attention

(University of Utah) Many of the infotainment features in most 2017 vehicles are so distracting they should not be enabled while a vehicle is in motion, according to a new study by University of Utah researchers.The study, led by psychology professor David L. Strayer, found In-Vehicle Information Systems take drivers' attention off the road for too long to be safe.

Assessing regional earthquake risk and hazards in the age of exascale

With emerging exascale supercomputers, researchers will soon be able to accurately simulate the ground motions of regional earthquakes quickly and in unprecedented detail, as well as predict how these movements will impact energy infrastructure—from the electric grid to local power plants—and scientific research facilities.

Researchers discovered excessive social interaction reduced collective response

From schools of fish, to swarms of insects, to flocks of birds, many animals live and move in groups. They have no leader, no central coordinator, and yet manage to perform awe-inspiring coordinated displays of collective motion. These...Show More Summary

One-way track for microwaves based on mechanical interference

(Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) EPFL researchers use interference in the motion of a micrometre-size drum to route microwave signals in a single direction.

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