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Waves in lakes make waves in the Earth

(University of Utah) In a study published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth, scientists at the University of Utah report that small seismic signals in lakes can aid science. As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws. Show More Summary

In a first for wearable optics, researchers develop stretchy fiber to capture body motion

(The Optical Society) Research in Optica offers the first demonstration of optical fibers sturdy enough to sense a wide range of human motion.

In a first for wearable optics, researchers develop stretchy fiber to capture body motion

The exciting applications of wearable sensors have sparked a tremendous amount of research and business investment in recent years. Sensors attached to the body or integrated into clothing could allow athletes and physical therapists...Show More Summary

Genome architecture caught in motion

(The Wistar Institute) Researchers at The Wistar Institute have uncovered new aspects of the three-dimensional organization of the genome, specifically how the genetic material is compacted and de-compacted in a timely fashion during the different phases of the cell cycle.

With new UK design studio, Leap Motion explores the boundaries of augmented reality

Mixed-reality sensor and peripherals maker Leap Motion Inc. signaled its intention to expand its efforts in the virtual and augmented reality industry with the announcement today of a London-based design research studio. A spokesperson...Show More Summary

Did Blackberry Get Too Old For Innovation?

Blackberry Limited, a Canadian company – previously known as Research In Motion Limited (RIM) – was founded in 1984. The company is renowned for its range of smartphones, tablets and other services. Blackberry is said to be the original smartphone makers. Show More Summary

Caution ahead: The growing challenge for drivers' attention

(University of Utah) Many of the infotainment features in most 2017 vehicles are so distracting they should not be enabled while a vehicle is in motion, according to a new study by University of Utah researchers.The study, led by psychology professor David L. Strayer, found In-Vehicle Information Systems take drivers' attention off the road for too long to be safe.

Assessing regional earthquake risk and hazards in the age of exascale

With emerging exascale supercomputers, researchers will soon be able to accurately simulate the ground motions of regional earthquakes quickly and in unprecedented detail, as well as predict how these movements will impact energy infrastructure—from the electric grid to local power plants—and scientific research facilities.

Researchers discovered excessive social interaction reduced collective response

From schools of fish, to swarms of insects, to flocks of birds, many animals live and move in groups. They have no leader, no central coordinator, and yet manage to perform awe-inspiring coordinated displays of collective motion. These...Show More Summary

One-way track for microwaves based on mechanical interference

(Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) EPFL researchers use interference in the motion of a micrometre-size drum to route microwave signals in a single direction.

Slowing the clockwork

Progress on the way to smart nanomachines: LMU chemists have modified the synthesis of a molecular motor so as to reduce the speed of its light-driven rotation, thus permitting the researchers to analyze the mechanism of motion in complete detail.

Laser Pulses Drum Up Sharp Images of Organs in Motion

Researchers have developed a photoacoustic imaging technique that uses lasers to create detailed ultrasound images in live animals. The method allows for complete internal body scans with enough resolution to see active organs, circulating cancer cells, and firing neural networks.

Using four-dimensional electron microscopy to track diffusion of nanoparticles in a liquid

A team of researchers at Caltech has developed a way to capture on film the superfast propulsive motion of Brownian objects, particularly those at the nanoscale. In their paper published on the open-access site Science Advances, theShow More Summary

Wireless motion capture device with widespread applications in fitness, health

A new "Fitbit for biomechanics" designed by researchers from Deakin University's School of Engineering has potential for industries from healthcare to sport.

VR cricket game uses motion capture technology for full immersive experience

With the cricket season in full swing, cricket fans can try out their batting skills at home with a virtual reality game developed by Stickee Studios in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bath.

VR cricket game uses motion capture technology for full immersive experience

(University of Bath) With the cricket season in full swing, now cricket fans can try out their batting skills in the comfort of their own homes in a virtual reality game, developed by Stickee Studios in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bath.

Fast, noninvasive technique for probing cells may reveal disease

Engineers have devised a way to assess a cell's mechanical properties simply by observation. The researchers use standard confocal microscopy to zero in on the constant, jiggling motions of a cell's particles -- telltale movements that can be used to decipher a cell's stiffness. Show More Summary

Fast, noninvasive technique for probing cells may reveal disease

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT engineers have devised a way to assess a cell's mechanical properties simply by observation. The researchers use standard confocal microscopy to zero in on the constant, jiggling motions of a cell's particles -- telltale movements that can be used to decipher a cell's stiffness. Show More Summary

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

Researchers at IMS and their coworkers have shown theoretically and experimentally that a high energy electron in circular/spiral motion radiates vortex photons from the radio wavelength to gamma rays. This greatly broadens application spectra of the vortex photons in the field of physical science. Show More Summary

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) Researchers at IMS and their coworkers have shown theoretically and experimentally that a high energy electron in circular/spiral motion radiates vortex photons in the entire wavelength range from the radio-wave to the gamma-rays. Show More Summary

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