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Rice University scientists named AAAS Fellows

(Rice University) Rice University professors Janet Braam and José Onuchic have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world's largest general scientific society.

Borophene shines alone as 2-D plasmonic material

An atom-thick film of boron could be the first pure two-dimensional material able to emit visible and near-infrared light by activating its plasmons, according to Rice University scientists.

Researchers use 3-D printers to turn century-old theory into complex schwarzites

Rice University engineers are using 3-D printers to turn structures that have until now existed primarily in theory into strong, light and durable materials with complex, repeating patterns.

Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war

Nature whispers its stories in a faint molecular language, and Rice University scientist Laurence Yeung and colleagues can finally tell one of those stories this week, thanks to a one-of-a-kind instrument that allowed them to hear what the atmosphere is saying with rare nitrogen molecules.

Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war

(Rice University) Researchers from Rice University, UCLA, Michigan State and the University of New Mexico have discovered a planetary-scale tug-of-war between life, deep Earth and the upper atmosphere that is expressed in atmospheric nitrogen. The research appears this week in Science Advances.

Math gets real in strong, lightweight structures

(Rice University) Rice University materials scientists lead a project to turn strong, light and compressible schwarzites from theory to reality with three-dimensional printers. The resulting materials share their properties from the nano- to the macroscale.

Some Latinos believe science may negatively impact their kids' faith

More than one-third of Latinos interviewed in a recent study believe science education may have a negative impact on the religious faith of their children, according to new research from sociologists at Rice University.

Some Latinos believe science may negatively impact their kids' faith

(Rice University) More than one-third of Latinos interviewed in a recent study believe science education may have a negative impact on the religious faith of their children.

Boles on Jefferson in Boston, 14 Nov.

Jefferson: Architect of American Liberty is a new biography of the third President by John B. Boles, a professor of history at Rice University. He was co-editor of the essay collection Seeing Jefferson Anew.Jonathan Yardley, longtime book critic for the Washington Post, really likes this book. Show More Summary

Historian shreds Trump for dissing his own countrymen when he should be celebrating veterans

last weekNews : The Raw Story

Douglas Brinkley, CNN’s presidential historian and a professor of history at Rice University, harshly criticized President Donald Trump for saying he believes Russian president Vladimir Putin is being truthful. Trump said Saturday that Putin had reassured him that Russia did not meddle in the...

Gold Nanoshells Ferry Chemo Drugs Into Cancer Cells to Spare Rest of Body

  Researchers at Rice and Northwestern universities engineered a way of encapsulating toxic chemo agents inside of gold nanoshells that deliver and deposit their contents only inside neoplastic cells. Reported on in the latest EarlyShow More Summary

Nanoshells could deliver more chemo with fewer side effects

(Rice University) Researchers investigating ways to deliver high doses of cancer-killing drugs inside tumors have shown they can use a laser and light-activated gold nanoparticles to remotely trigger the release of FDA-approved cancer drugs inside cancer cells in laboratory cultures.

Immigrants living in US near California-Mexico border have history of trauma

(Rice University) More than 80 percent of immigrants residing in the U.S. without authorization near the California-Mexico border have a lifetime history of traumatic events, according to a new study from a psychologist at Rice University.

Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

HOUSTON - (Nov. 2, 2017) - Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University engineers. Rice materials scientist Rouzbeh Shahsavari...Show More Summary

Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

(Rice University) Heat transport through pillared graphene could be made faster by manipulating the junctions between sheets of graphene and the nanotubes that connect them, according to Rice University researchers.

Dioxane-chomping microbe has helpful gene

Rice University researchers have discovered a bacteria-borne gene that helps degrade a form of dioxane, a groundwater contaminant and suspected carcinogen. The discovery could be the basis for a much-needed tool to decide how contaminated sites should be treated.

Dioxane-chomping microbe has helpful gene

(Rice University) Rice University researchers have discovered a bacteria-borne gene that triggers the degradation of dioxane, a groundwater contaminant and suspected carcinogen. The discovery could lead to a tool that helps decide how to treat contaminated sites.

Researchers study organic matter processes in rice fields

A soil scientist from RUDN University reports that plant root secretions affect microorganisms and biochemical processes in paddy soils such as rice fields. Rice field soils play a very important role in the agriculture of Southeast Asia, since they cover > 160 Mio ha and are used to produce food for a quarter of world population. Show More Summary

RUDN University researcher found out what happens to organic matter on rice fields

A soil scientist from RUDN University has found out how plant root secretions affect microorganisms and biochemical processes in paddy soils (rice fields, for instance). Rice field soils play a very important role in the agriculture of Southeast Asia, since they cover > 160 Mio ha and are used to produce food for a quarter of world population. Show More Summary

Chromosome organization emerges from 1-D patterns

The DNA in a human cell is 2 yards (1.83 meters) long and wraps around millions of bead-like histone proteins to fit inside the cell's nucleus. Researchers at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine showed that examining the chemical state of these proteins makes it possible to predict how an entire DNA chromosome will fold.

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