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Graphene on Toast Paves Way for Edible Electronics

Graphene: It’s what’s for dinner. Scientists at Rice University are testing new ways to embed graphene patterns onto food, fabric, wood, and other objects. Famed for its toughness and conductivity, the basic structural […] The post Graphene on Toast Paves Way for Edible Electronics appeared first on Geek.com.

Rice U. reports progress in pursuit of sickle cell cure

AUSTIN - (Feb. 16, 2018) - Scientists have successfully used gene editing to repair 20 to 40 percent of stem and progenitor cells taken from the peripheral blood of patients with sickle cell disease, according to Rice University bioengineer...Show More Summary

Rice U. reports progress in pursuit of sickle cell cure

(Rice University) Rice University bioengineer Gang Bao and his colleagues use gene editing to correct the mutation responsible for sickle cell disease in up to 40 percent of patients' cells used for lab testing.

Edible graphene could embed RFID tags in food

Graphene is extremely thin and strong, a great conductor of heat and electricity, is antibacterial and can even hunt down cancer – and now you can have your wonder material and eat it, too. The lab of James Tour at Rice University has...Show More Summary

Scientists create patterned graphene onto food, paper, cloth, cardboard

Rice University scientists who introduced laser-induced graphene (LIG) have enhanced their technique to produce what may become a new class of edible electronics.

Graphene on toast, anyone?

(Rice University) Rice University scientists who introduced laser-induced graphene have enhanced their technique to produce what may become a new class of edible electronics.

Some black and Latino Christians rely on religion for healing

(Rice University) Christians who are comparatively well-represented in the medical field, like Korean-Americans, understand the relationship between faith and health differently than those who are not, like African-Americans and Latinos.

Quantum dots display promise for polymers

Rice University scientists plan to employ the power of the sun to build functional synthetic polymers using photosensitive quantum dots -- microscopic semiconducting particles -- as a catalyst. The luminescent dots are only a few nanometers wide, but are highly tunable for their unique optical and electronic properties. Show More Summary

Quantum dots display promise for polymers

(Rice University) Rice University scientists employ the power of the sun to build functional synthetic polymers using photosensitive, semiconducting quantum dots as a catalyst.

Scientists simplify process to make polymers with light-triggered nanoparticles

Rice University scientists plan to employ the power of the sun to build functional synthetic polymers using photosensitive quantum dots—microscopic semiconducting particles—as a catalyst.

Fast-spinning spheres show nanoscale systems' secrets

Spin a merry-go-round fast enough and the riders fly off in all directions. But the spinning particles in a Rice University lab do just the opposite. Experiments in the Rice lab of chemical engineer Sibani Lisa Biswal show micron-sized spheres coming together under the influence of a rapidly spinning magnetic field. Show More Summary

Fast-spinning spheres show nanoscale systems' secrets

Spin a merry-go-round fast enough and the riders fly off in all directions. But the spinning particles in a Rice University lab do just the opposite.

Fast-spinning spheres show nanoscale systems' secrets

(Rice University) A Rice University lab studies the effects of a spinning magnetic field on magnetically responsive particles. The findings could help researchers use these colloidal particles as models for 2-D materials whose enhanced properties have led to improved performance in applications ranging from electronics, data storage, catalysis and photonics.

StarTalk Radio --The Trappist Star System --"Life in the Terminator Zone" (LISTEN)

This week on StarTalk All-Stars, astrophysicist Emily Rice, comic co-host Chuck Nice, and special guest David Kipping, Assistant Professor of Astronomy at Columbia University, are heading off to TRAPPIST-1, the recently discovered red dwarf star 40 light years away that...        

BU: Police shootings reflect structural racism

(Boston University School of Medicine) The deaths of Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Michael Brown, and other unarmed black victims at the hands of police sparked a national conversation about racism and policing, from the Black Lives Matter movement to kneeling NFL players. Show More Summary

Two-stage gas sensor reports on soil dynamics

A gene "genie" developed by Rice University scientists grants researchers valuable data about microbes through puffs of gas from the soil. The latest version is a robust two-stage microbial sensor that will help bioengineers, geobiologists...Show More Summary

Two-stage gas sensor reports on soil dynamics

(Rice University) A robust two-stage microbial sensor developed at Rice University will help researchers observe gene expression and the bioavailability of nutrients in environments like soil and sediments without disturbing them.

New Books in American Religious History: 2018 Year in Preview, Part One (January-April)

Four of us—Erin Bartram (University of Hartford), William Black (Rice University), Michel Sun Lee (University of Texas at Austin), and Moxy Moczygemba (University of Florida)—are excited to present part one of the 2018 book preview list!...Show More Summary

Weak hydrogen bonds key to strong, tough infrastructure

The right mix of hydrogen bonds in polymer and cement composites is critical to making strong, tough and ductile infrastructure material, according to Rice University scientists who want to mimic the mechanics of mother-of-pearl and similar natural composites with synthetic materials.

Weak hydrogen bonds key to strong, tough infrastructure

(Rice University) Rice University engineers study what it takes to make strong and tough infrastructures by probing the interfacial interactions of polymer and cement, which are key to composite properties.

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