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Drop in testosterone helped humans advance: study

Anthropologists at Duke University say that the near metamorphosis that occurred in the human skull during the very end of the Stone Age, which gave way to the Cro-Magnon colonization of Europe, indicates plummeting levels of testosterone.

Study: Farmer and hunter groups 'kept their distance' from each other in Stone Age

11 months agoOdd : Boing Boing

"When farmers showed up from the Near East about 7,500 years ago, eager to grow their grains in the soil of Central Europe, they were met by indigenous hunters and gatherers.

Isotopic data show farming arrived in Europe with migrants

MADISON – For decades, archaeologists have debated how farming spread to Stone Age Europe, setting the stage for the rise of Western civilization. Now, new data gleaned from the teeth of prehistoric farmers and the hunter-gatherers with...Show More Summary

Mysteries Beneath Our Noses: Stone Age Zombies?

Archaeologists in Europe and in the Middle East have found something quite puzzling-stone aged bodies with their skulls smashed. It would appear that several years after the bodies were buried, the heads were detached and smashed and then reburied separate from the body. Show More Summary

Redating of Later Stone Age brings it in line with Upper Paleolithic

Two new papers in PNAS document that the Later Stone Age (LSA), the period of African prehistory corresponding to the Upper Paleolithic in Europe, began earlier than previously thought (c. 44ka BP), and contained elements of the material...Show More Summary

Migrant farm workers

Mostly: Genetic study shed light on rise of agriculture in Stone Age Europe One of the most debated developments in human history is the transition from hunter?gatherer to agricultural societies. This week’s edition of Science presents the genetic findings of a Swedish?Danish research team, which show that agriculture spread to Northern Europe via migration from Southern [...]

Genes shed light on spread of agriculture in Stone Age Europe

One of the most debated developments in human history is the transition from hunter-gatherer to agricultural societies. Scientists have now shown that agriculture spread to Northern Europe via migration from Southern Europe.

Genes shed light on spread of agriculture in Stone Age Europe

One of the most debated developments in human history is the transition from hunter?gatherer to agricultural societies. This week's edition of Science presents the genetic findings of a Swedish?Danish research team, which show hat agriculture spread to Northern Europe via migration from Southern Europe. read more

New study chronicles the rise of agriculture in Europe

This release is available in Danish and Swedish. An analysis of 5,000-year-old DNA taken from the Stone Age remains of four humans excavated in Sweden is helping researchers understand how agriculture spread throughout Europe long ago. Show More Summary

America 'discovered by Stone Age hunters from Europe'

New archaeological evidence suggests that America was first discovered by Stone Age people from Europe – 10,000 years before the Siberian-originating ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World.A remarkable series ofShow More Summary

Cave Paintings Showed True Colors of Stone Age Horses

A new study of prehistoric horse DNA suggests that spotted horses roamed ancient Europe, and that early artists may have been reproducing what they saw rather than creating imaginary creatures.

Stone Age travelers

Tribesmen who lived in western Europe at the beginning of the Neolithic Era, or New Stone Age, liked travelling, as demonstrated by the genetic affinity between the prehistoric inhabitants of France, Spain, Germany and other parts of Europe, European archeologists reported in an article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

Going underground: The massive European network of Stone Age tunnels that weaves from Scotland to Turkey

Stone Age man created a massive network of underground tunnels criss-crossing Europe from Scotland to Turkey, a new book on the ancient superhighways has claimed.German archaeologist Dr Heinrich Kusch said evidence of the tunnels has...Show More Summary

The massive European network of Stone Age tunnels that weaves from Scotland to Turkey - 4th http://www.blogger.com/img/blank.gifAug 2011

3 years agoNews : The Coming Crisis

Stone Age man created a massive network of underground tunnels criss-crossing Europe from Scotland to Turkey, a new book on the ancient superhighways has claimed. German archaeologist Dr Heinrich Kusch said evidence of the tunnels has been found under hundreds of Neolithic settlements all over the continent. Show More Summary

Maybe not so straight as?

Arrow origins traced to Africa “The invention of the bow and arrow used to be closely linked to the late Upper Paleolithic (Stone Age) in Europe,” less than 30,000 years ago, says anthropologist Marlize Lombard of South Africa’s University of Johannesburg, in a study in the current Journal of Archaeological Science. Last year, however, Lombard and her [...]

Hiking and politics in the Basque region's Grand Canyon

3 years agoLifestyle / Travel : Gadling

"The Basques have the oldest history in Europe," says Dr. Alberto Santana, historian and co-founder of Aunia, a Basque cultural magazine. "We have been here since the Stone Age and have the most distinct language in the world. There are some 6,000 languages in 12 language families. Show More Summary

Europe a la Carte Podcast 21 October 2010

The 21 October Europe a la Carte Podcast summaries the following three recent Blog posts: Coming Face to Face with the Stone Age in Paris Why You Should Stop in Kayseri, Turkey Tempting Your Stomach at the Outdoor Market in Vieste, Puglia, Italy There’s an invitation to the Twitter Party on 22 October 2010 celebrating [...]Show More Summary

Coming Face-to-Face with the Stone Age in Paris

There really is so much to see and do in Paris, something to suit everyone’s tastes and interests. So well featured is this European city on the Europe a la Carte blog that Karen recently produced a post summarizing the Best of Paris Travel Tips as recommended in a number of posts on this blog [...]Show More Summary

Stone Age flour found across Europe

Once thought of as near total carnivores, early humans ate ground flour 20,000 years before the dawn of agriculture. Flour residues recovered from 30,000-year-old grinding stones found in Italy, Russia and the Czech Republic point to...Show More Summary

Europe's prehistoric tombs built in bursts

Western Europe's massive prehistoric tombs were built in a burst of activity over a few centuries around 4000 BC, suggests dating evidence, rather than continuously throughout the Stone Age.

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