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New study suggests shark declines can lead to changes in reef fish body shapes

(University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science) Scientists studying nearly identical coral reef systems off Australia discovered something unusual on the reefs subjected to nearly exclusive fishing of sharks--fish with significantly smaller eyes and tails. Show More Summary

Who Might Benefit From Immunotherapy? New Study Suggests Possible Marker

New research finds that PDL-1 expressed in antigen presenting cells - macrophages and dendritic cells found in the tumor microenvironment and in the nearby lymph nodes -- is a better indicator than PDL-1 in the tumor of who will respond to immunotherapy drugs.

Who might benefit from immunotherapy? New study suggests possible marker

(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) New research finds that PDL-1 expressed in antigen presenting cells -- macrophages and dendritic cells found in the tumor microenvironment and in the nearby lymph nodes -- is a better indicator than PDL-1 in the tumor of who will respond to immunotherapy drugs.

Early puberty puts women at higher risk for heart disease and stroke

4 hours agoHealth : Reuters: Health

(Reuters Health) - Girls who start menstruating before they’re 12 years old may have a greater risk of heart disease and stroke later in life than their peers who go through puberty later, a U.K. study suggests.

New study suggests shark declines can lead to changes in reef fish body shapes

Scientists studying nearly identical coral reef systems off Australia discovered something unusual on the reefs subjected to nearly exclusive fishing of sharks—fish with significantly smaller eyes and tails. The study is the first field evidence of body shape changes in fish due to human-driven shark declines from overfishing. Show More Summary

Longer breastfeeding tied to lower diabetes risk for mothers

6 hours agoHealth : Reuters: Health

(Reuters Health) - Mothers who nurse their babies now have another reason to continue as long as they can: longer periods of breastfeeding are associated with a lower risk of diabetes even decades later, a U.S. study suggests.

Mystery over death of 15 million Aztecs may be solved after nearly 500 years, study suggests

7 hours agoNews : The Lookout

Scientists believe they may have discovered the cause of an epidemic that struck Mexico’s Aztec population in 1545, killing up to 15 million people. In a paper published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, they describe how DNA extractedShow More Summary

Memory Loss From West Nile Virus May Be Preventable

People who survive brain infection with West Nile virus can have neurological problems long after the virus is gone. A new study in mice suggests that such ongoing problems may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain's ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones. Show More Summary

Evening Hours May Pose Higher Risk for Overeating, Especially When Under Stress, Study Finds

Experiments with a small group of overweight men and women have added to evidence that "hunger hormone" levels rise and "satiety (or fullness) hormone" levels decrease in the evening. The findings also suggest that stress may increase hunger hormone levels more in the evening, and the impact of hormones on appetite may be greater for people prone to binge eating.

New study suggests human fleas and lice were behind Black Death, not rodents

A team of researchers with the University of Oslo has found evidence that suggests human fleas and lice, not rodents, were behind the spread of the plague that killed millions of people over the course of several centuries. In theirShow More Summary

Myelin Loss Can Be Assessed With Innovative Imaging Approach, Study Suggests

A novel imaging approach enables assessment of key nervous system deterioration in multiple sclerosis (MS), a new study in mice suggests. The research, “Development of a PET radioligand for potassium channels to image CNS demyelination,” was published in the journal Scientific Reports. Show More Summary

Seawater-swallowing surfers harbor higher levels of antibiotic resistant bacteria

18 hours agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

A UK study has found that regular surfers were three times more likely to have an antibiotic resistant strain of E. coli bacteria in their gut than non-surfers. This not only suggests surfers are more likely to be at risk from theseShow More Summary

Early menarche and menopause linked to cardiovascular disease risk – study

Increase screening for women who start their periods at a young age or those reaching menopause early, experts suggest Women who start their periods at an early age, or experience an early menopause, are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease, new research suggests. Show More Summary

Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke

(BMJ) Starting periods early -- before the age of 12 -- is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.

Maybe Rats Aren't to Blame for the Black Death

A provocative new study suggests that medieval plagues spread via fleas and lice on people.

Scientists home in on a potential Anthropocene 'Golden Spike'

A new study suggests that key geological markers align towards a start for the Anthropocene somewhere between 1952 to 1955, based on signals from nuclear testing and fossil fuel burning.

Greater screen time linked to worsening sleep quality in early childhood

(Reuters Health) - Higher use of electronic media is tied to poorer sleep quality in children as young as three, a new study from Germany suggests.

A matter of mobility: New strategy for drug discovery

A joint industry/academia study of a cancer target protein reveals unusual relation between binding site flexibility and drug-target lifetime. The results suggest a new strategy for drug discovery.

Has a Centuries-Old Aztec Mystery Been Solved?

Can the teeth of 10 people solve a centuries-old mystery? According to a study published Monday in Nature Ecology and Evolution, perhaps. Its authors suggest that an epidemic that killed as many as 17 million people over the course of two outbreaks in the 16th century and had a hand...

Exploring the neuroscience of behavioral therapy in rats

(Society for Neuroscience) Psychotherapy may improve symptoms of psychiatric disorders by increasing activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, suggests a study of rats exposed to chronic stress. The research, published in JNeurosci, is a step toward understanding how the brain processes influenced by behavioral therapy may be targeted to improve treatment.

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