Trend Results : The Great Recession


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The New Men Without Jobs Conservative Excuse

FRED notes that the employment to population ratio for men aged 25-54 was 87.5% before the Great Recession. It fell to less than 81% during the Great Recession and has risen back to only 84.5%. Keynesians like myself see this as evidence that we still need more of an aggregate demand boost. Show More Summary

Trump: Titan of Corporate Tax Cuts

This article by David Haggith was first published on The Great Recession Blog. Trump’s corporate tax cut is supply-side stimulus I could agree with if done right, even though it primarily helps the rich. Trump wants to cut the top corporate...Show More Summary

Our Economy Is Booming, So Why Are Kids Still Going to Bed Hungry?

Click here for reuse options! Food security has improved in the years following the Great Recession, but anti-hunger groups say too many kids are still at risk. In 2009, when the economic devastation of the Great Recession was most widely...Show More Summary

Obama’s Non-Recovery Isn’t Due to the Size of the Recession

Harvard University’s Robert Barro has a great piece ?over at the Wall Street Journal debunking the claim the Obama non-recovery was the result of the 2008 recession’s severity and the accompanying financial crisis. He writes that the...Show More Summary

Trump Tax Plan Turns the Donald into Trickle-Down King

This article by David Haggith was first published on The Great Recession Blog : If George Bush Senior thought Reaganomics was “voodoo economics,” he’d think the Trump tax plan was its kachina doll, and if GB Minor had been smoking weed...Show More Summary

Morning in America Delivered by Democrats

Click here for reuse options! Democratic presidents presided over higher stock market returns and corporate profits, greater compensation growth and productivity increases. Nine years after the Great Recession began during the tax- and...Show More Summary

Biggest Income Gains In U.S. Accrue To Suburban Cities

The news last week that U.S. household income surged 5.2% in 2015 was a welcome boost for a country still working its way out of the crater of the Great Recession. But a closer examination of the data shows the gains were far from evenly distributed, and not what many pundits made it out to be.

Chart of the Day: For the 7th Straight Year, Illegal Immigration Remains a Non-Crisis

Here's the latest from Pew: The U.S. unauthorized immigrant population — 11.1 million in 2014 — has stabilized since the end of the Great Recession, as the number from Mexico declined but the total from other regions of the world increased,...Show More Summary

Where do the presidential candidates stand on Wall Street regulation?

The 2008 financial crisis touched off the worst recession since the 1930s Great Depression. Reckless trading and aggressive practices on Wall Street in the prior boom years were pinned with much of the blame. Continue reading ? The post Where do the presidential candidates stand on Wall Street regulation? appeared first on PBS NewsHour.

WHY IT MATTERS: Wall Street Regulation

The financial crisis that struck in 2008 touched off the worst recession since the 1930s Great Depression, wiping out $11 trillion in U.S. household wealth and leaving about 8 million Americans jobless. In the aftermath, Congress enacted...Show More Summary

Morning in America Delivered by Democrats

Nine years after the Great Recession began during the tax- and regulation-slashing Bush administration, some startlingly good economic news arrived from Washington, D.C., last week. The incomes of typical Americans rose in 2015 by 5.2...Show More Summary

Trump: Trojan Horse for the Establishment or Mouth for the Common Man?

This article by David Haggith was originally published on The Great Recession Blog. I crave the opportunity to see an antiestablishment candidate win the election. I would exult in seeing our corrupt establishment shattered. So, while...Show More Summary

Museum Expansions Shot Out Of The Recession With Speed And (Huge) Ambition

“Architects are once again fully engaged in the invention — and reinvention — of cultural landscapes, for the first time since the Great Recession sent many of these projects into flat files.”

Africa Missed Modern Globalization. . . And That Was A Good Thing

Africa was sidetracked by the globalization wave of the last quarter of the 20th century. But that turned out to be a good thing. Most African frontier economies escaped the global financial bubble and the Great Recession that followed, and managed to maintain high growth rates, catching up to their [...]

The Oregon Business Association’s tax flip-flop

It was 2009. The Great Recession had hammered Oregon’s finances. The Oregon legislature faced a choice. It could slash the state budget. That meant laying off more teachers, cutting services that protect foster kids, and weakening many other essential public structures that Oregonians depend on. Show More Summary

Report: US government inaction is hampering economic growth

As the U.S. economy enters its eighth year of its recovery from the Great Recession, one major factor is slowing its growth: Government gridlock. … Click to Continue »

Emerging From The Great Recession

There was some rather important economic news yesterday, which could be summed up as "things are getting better." Incomes are rising, unemployment has stayed low, the number of uninsured Americans has now dropped by half (thanks to Obamacare), and all of these things are happening at historic rates. Show More Summary

Neel Kashkari’s Supply-Side Solution to Mostly a Demand-Side Problem

Neel Kashkari tries to explain the slow pace of the recovery from the Great Recession: When accommodative monetary policies were coupled with expansionary fiscal policies, other experts had reasonably expected a strong recovery from the depths of the Great Recession. Show More Summary

Famous Economist Paul Romer Says Macroeconomics Is All Bullshit

Macroeconomics is the study of big stuff: interest rates, recessions, unemployment, inflation, long-term economic growth, etc. It didn't exactly bowl anyone over with its predictive success during the Great Recession, and ever since economists have been locked in an epic existential struggle. Show More Summary

Breadwinner Jobs Still Below Dubya Highs in 2006/2007, Real Median Household Income Still Below 2007 Level

As we ponder the economic recovery after The Great Recession (and financial crisis), we see a disturbing pattern of middle-class job demolition. The post Breadwinner Jobs Still Below Dubya Highs in 2006/2007, Real Median Household Income Still Below 2007 Level was originally published at The Wall Street Examiner. Follow the money!

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