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WannaCry Update: Microsoft Pushes a “Geneva Convention” to Thwart Cyberattacks

But would a digital cybertreaty of the future bind Redmond to operate Windows XP as a public utility?

What WannaCry Means for the SOC

In addition to the endpoint and network operational efforts for WannaCry, this outbreak presents great learning and response opportunities for analysts in the security operations center (SOC). Understanding and automating these best practices will set you up to handle evolving WannaCry activities, as well as the next fast-moving attack. Show More Summary

Petya-like infection attempts still active in Australia: Symantec

Both Petya and WannaCry highlighted that Australia is not immune to cyber threats, and the best mode of defence is educating staff and reporting malicious activity, Symantec's APJ CEO has said.

Another WannaCry Ransomware Attack: LG Electronics Takes Systems Offline

Wanna Cry ransomware attack first surfaced in May 2017, it was a worldwide cyberattack by the WannaCry ransomware crypto worm, which targeted Microsoft Windows computer as they encrypted data and demanded ransom payments in the Bitcoin cryptocurrency. Image Source: checkmarx.com It has not stopped since many big organizations have fallen prey. Show More Summary

The online fundraiser for WannaCry 'hero' Marcus Hutchins had to block $150,000 in donations

An online legal defence fund for Marcus Hutchins, the 23-year-old British security researcher who halted the WannaCry cyberattack and was arrested in the US by the FBI, is refunding anyone who donated by credit card. The refunds come...Show More Summary

Gangster rapping hackers warn us about the dangers of ransomware

We’re all vulnerable to attack. Not just TNW, not just the US, but the entire internet. And it is a serious problem. Sure, we talked about WannaCry and other cyberattacks, but we simply weren’t aware of how big the problem had become. Show More Summary

Are Popular Social Media Accounts more Likely to Get Targeted by Hackers?

Hacker attacks are nothing new – yet they seem to have evolved in terms of focus and impact, as recent devastating malware attacks like WannaCry and Petya have demonstrated. Everybody is a target nowadays, but the trend does not stop at large companies and tech giants. It seems that cybercriminals may also show particular fondness […]

Your failure to apply critical cybersecurity updates is putting your company at risk from the next WannaCry or Petya

Despite warnings and international cyber-incidents, too many organisations still aren't bothering to apply security patches, a report has warned.

WannaCry ransomware attack at LG Electronics takes systems offline

Consumer electronics giant confirms WannaCry was found on a self-service kiosk in South Korea and systems were shut down for two days to prevent spread.

Governments Need To Adapt To A Changing Threat Landscape

Security threats aren't all the same. Although there are some widespread security events like the recent WannaCry and NotPetya outbreaks, some industry verticals are hit in more in more targeted ways. Mike Brown is RSA's vice president and general manager for the public sector. Show More Summary

Windows SMB Users at Risk: Block These Ports to Protect Yourself

Cast your mind back to May 2017. FBI Director James Comey was fired, terrorists struck an Arianna Grande concert in Manchester, and the world fell victim to the WannaCry ransomware attack. WannaCry infected more than 230,000 computers across 150 countries. Show More Summary

Dealing with Ransomware Attacks

Have you heard of WannaCry, Cryptolocker or Cryptowall? These, and other malware, cause ransomware attacks. That’s where someone steals your data and holds it hostage. Your data is worth far more than your hardware, so it can put any business into a spin. Show More Summary

British Cybersecurity Expert Pleads Not Guilty To Federal Malware Charges

last monthNews : The Two-Way

Before these allegations, 23-year-old Marcus Hutchins was known for his role in finding the kill switch to the WannaCry ransomware cyber-attack last May. He is accused of creating a malware scheme.

WannaCry Hero Pleads Not Guilty to Malware Charges

On Monday, cybersecurity researcher Marcus Hutchins, better known by the nom-de-keyboard MalwareTech, pleaded not guilty to creating and distributing malware, Motherboard reports. As April Glaser has previously explained in Slate, Hutchins rose to international prominence after he helped stop the WannaCry ransomware attack earlier this year. Show More Summary

WannaCry savior pleads not guilty to creating banking malware

MalwareTech, the security researcher catapulted to global fame after stopping the WannaCry ransomware, has plead not guilty to creating software used to harvest banking credentials. The UK-based malware expert, whose real name is Marcus...Show More Summary

Cybersecurity expert who found WannaCry's 'kill switch' pleads not guilty in different attack

An attorney for a British cybersecurity researcher accused of creating malicious software to steal banking information says the researcher is “brilliant” and “a hero” who will eventually be cleared. Marcus Hutchins pleaded not guilty on Monday in Wisconsin federal court to charges of conspiring...

Cybersecurity expert who found WannaCry's 'kill switch' pleads not guilty in different attack

An attorney for a British cybersecurity researcher accused of creating malicious software to steal banking information says the researcher is “brilliant” and “a hero” who will eventually be cleared. Marcus Hutchins pleaded not guilty on Monday in Wisconsin federal court to charges of conspiring...

The researcher who stopped WannaCry has pleaded not guilty to charges he created the Kronos malware

Marcus Hutchins, the British researcher famous for halting the spread of the devastating WannaCry malware, has pleaded "not guilty" to accusations he created another notorious piece of malware: Kronos, Motherboard reported on Monday. Hutchins,...Show More Summary

3 months after WannaCry, NHS cries uncle, signs support contract for Windows XP

In 2015 the UK Government declined to renew their extended support contract for the very obsolete Windows XP, saying “We expect most remaining government devices using Windows XP will be able to mitigate any risks, using the CESG guidance.”...Show More Summary

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