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Deadly Heart Rhythm Halted by Noninvasive Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that radiation therapy -- aimed directly at the heart -- can be used to treat patients with a life-threatening heart rhythm. Show More Summary

Cedars-Sinai Helps a Future Physician Grow From Cradle to Medical School

Shannon Sullivan, 26, a student at Howard University College of Medicine in Washington D.C., has already co-authored a major study in a prominent neuroscience journal and earned a coveted fellowship. She traces her career ambitions to...Show More Summary

Kidney disease increases risk of diabetes, study shows

(Washington University in St. Louis) Diabetes is known to increase a person's risk of kidney disease. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true: Kidney dysfunction increases the risk of diabetes. Show More Summary

Kidney Disease Increases Risk of Diabetes, Study Shows

Diabetes is known to increase a person's risk of kidney disease. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true: Kidney dysfunction increases the risk of diabetes.Show More Summary

Alzheimer's Damage in Mice Reduced with Compound That Targets APOE Gene

People who carry the APOE4 genetic variant face a substantial risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a compound that targets the APOE protein in the brains of mice and protects against damage induced by the Alzheimer's protein amyloid beta. Show More Summary

Obesity prevented in mice fed high-fat diet

(Washington University School of Medicine) Washington University researchers activated the Hedgehog protein pathway in the fat cells of mice. After eight weeks of eating a high-fat diet, mice that had been engineered with genes to activate the pathway didn't gain weight, but control animals whose Hedgehog pathways were not activated became obese.

Medicare shift to quality over quantity presents challenges

(Washington University School of Medicine) A new study hints that even large physician practices may have trouble moving to a payment system that rewards quality of health care over quantity of services delivered. The analysis included...Show More Summary

GW School of Medicine & Health Sciences Participates in Scientific Research Summit in Spain

The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences will participate in the First International Scientific Research Summit of the GW-Spain Consortium in Madrid on Dec. 1-2.

News From and About Johns Hopkins Scientists at Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting

The following Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine faculty are scheduled to speak at the 2017 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 11-15. To arrange interviews, or for other information, call or email the media contacts listed above.

How Cells Detect, Mend DNA Damage May Improve Chemotherapy

Human cells have a way of detecting and mending DNA damage caused by some common chemotherapy drugs, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings could have important implications for treating cancer.

How cells detect, mend DNA damage may improve chemotherapy

(Washington University School of Medicine) Human cells have a way of detecting and mending DNA damage caused by some common chemotherapy drugs, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings could have important implications for treating cancer.

In autism, too many brain connections may be at root of condition

(Washington University School of Medicine) Mutations in a gene linked to autism in people causes neurons to form too many connections in rodents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that malfunctions in communication between brain cells could be at the root of autism.

Penny-wise, pound-foolish decisions explained by neurons' firing

(Washington University School of Medicine) People sometimes spend as much time deciding whether to spend a few cents more on groceries as they do deciding whether to spend a few thousand dollars extra when buying a car. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Show More Summary

In Autism, Too Many Brain Connections May Be at Root of Condition

Mutations in a gene linked to autism in people causes neurons to form too many connections in rodents, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that malfunctions in communication between brain cells could be at the root of autism.

Early Childhood Adversities Linked to Health Problems in Tweens, Teens

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a pathway in the brain that seems to connect exposure to adverse experiences during early childhood with depression and problems with physical health in teens and preteens.

Early childhood adversities linked to health problems in tweens, teens

(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a pathway in the brain that seems to connect exposure to adverse experiences during early childhood with depression and problems with physical health in teens and preteens.

Large Declines Seen in Teen Substance Abuse, Delinquency

Survey data indicate that in recent years, teens have become far less likely to abuse alcohol, nicotine and illicit drugs, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Teens also are less likely to engage in behaviors like fighting and stealing, and the researchers believe the declines in substance use and delinquency are connected.

Large declines seen in teen substance abuse, delinquency

(Washington University School of Medicine) Survey data indicate that in recent years, teens have become far less likely to abuse alcohol, nicotine and illicit drugs, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Show More Summary

Portable 3D Scanner to Assess Elephantiasis Patients

2 months agoIndustries / Medical : medGadget

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a portable 3D scanner that can help health workers to rapidly assess patients with elephantiasis, a condition that causes swollen limbs. The scanner allows medical professionals to measure the volume and dimensions of swollen limbs in the comfort of a patient’s home. Approximately […]

Autism often associated with multiple new mutations

Most cases of autism appear to be associated with the appearance of new mutations that are not inherited from the child's parents, researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine report. These new mutations occur inShow More Summary

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