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Scientists discover new nanoparticle, dubbed exomeres

(Weill Cornell Medicine) A new cellular messenger discovered by Weill Cornell Medicine scientists may help reveal how cancer cells co-opt the body's intercellular delivery service to spread to new locations in the body.

NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medicine Launch Living Donor Liver Transplant Program

To expand access to life-saving liver transplants for those in need, NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medicine have unveiled a new living donor liver transplant program. It performed its first such transplant with success in late January.

Most commonly prescribed drug for infantile epilepsy may also be most effective

(Weill Cornell Medicine) Levetiracetam, the most commonly prescribed drug for US infants with epilepsy, may be significantly more effective than the second-choice drug phenobarbital, according to a new study by scientists from Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian and 16 other research institutions. Show More Summary

Weill Cornell Medicine Joins TriNetX Health Research Network

TriNetX has announced that Weill Cornell Medicine has joined the TriNetX global health research network. Weill Cornell Medicine is a comprehensive, integrated academic healthcare delivery systems, and is making its total patient population of over two million available for query through TriNetX’s federated network. Show More Summary

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center researchers.

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

(Weill Cornell Medicine) Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center researchers.

Could a high-salt diet cause cognitive decline and dementia?

last monthTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

A new gut-brain connection has been revealed in a study from scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine. The research found that mice fed a high-salt diet directly led to cognitive impairment, dementia, and reduced blood flow in regions of...Show More Summary

A high-salt diet produces dementia in mice

(Weill Cornell Medicine) A high-salt diet reduces resting blood flow to the brain and causes dementia in mice.

Scientists identify immune cells that keep gut fungi under control

(Weill Cornell Medicine) Immune cells that process food and bacterial antigens in the intestines control the intestinal population of fungi, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists. Defects in the fungus-fighting abilities of these cells may contribute to some cases of Crohn's disease and other forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Mind, mood and our microbiome: Emerging connections

(Weill Cornell Medicine) It was first thought that the brain was separate from other organs and functions in the body, but more and more we are seeing research revealing a connection between our brains and the rest of our body. One such connection is between our brain and our gut, directly impacting our mind, mood and microbiome. Show More Summary

Menopause triggers metabolic changes in brain that may promote Alzheimer's

(Weill Cornell Medicine) Menopause causes metabolic changes in the brain that may increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, a team from Weill Cornell Medicine and the University of Arizona Health Sciences has shown in new research.

Weill Cornell Medicine's Clinical & Translational Science Center awarded $45.3m NIH renewal

(Weill Cornell Medicine) Weill Cornell Medicine has received a $45.3million renewal grant from the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program to continue funding its multi-institutional Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC) until 2022.

Neuro-Oncologist Dr. Howard Fine wins NIH Director's Pioneer Award

(Weill Cornell Medicine) Internationally renowned neuro-oncologist Dr. Howard A. Fine of Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian will receive a five-year, $6 million National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award for brain cancer research.

A cellular tango: Immune and nerve cells work together to fight gut infections

(Weill Cornell Medicine) Nerve cells in the gut play a crucial role in the body's ability to marshal an immune response to infection, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists.

ARCADIA Trial Will Test Link Between Stroke and a Common Heart Condition

A new clinical trial led by investigators at NewYork-Presbyterian, Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and Weill Cornell Medicine aims to identify and treat what may be a common underlying cause of recurrent strokes.

Dr. Robert Burakoff Named to Leadership Roles in Gastroenterology at NewYork-Presbyterian and Weill Cornell Medicine

Dr. Robert Burakoff, a renowned expert in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), has been named vice chair for ambulatory services for the Weill Department of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical...Show More Summary

Dissolvable device could make closing surgical incisions a cinch

(Weill Cornell Medicine) Like many surgeons, Dr. Jason Spector is often faced with the challenge of securely closing the abdominal wall without injuring the intestines. If the process goes awry, there can be serious consequences for patients, including bowel perforations or a hernia at the incision site. Often, repairing these complications requires additional surgeries.

Brain's connectivity network may provide key insights into neurological disorders

(Weill Cornell Medicine) A deeper understanding of the brain's connectivity network of neurons and its relationship to the organ's deep tissue could allow researchers to predict brain spatial patterns and recognize what processes relate to neurological disorders, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine and the University of California at San Francisco.

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